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to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just three days' time, we will be seeing up the old year and welcoming in the new, but before that, we will be taking the chance to reflect on some of the main events of the task 12 months. >> in europe, it was all about the debt crisis. greece and spain were the worst hit. >> eventually, it was the european central bank's controversial bond-buying program that manage to come down the markets -- calm down the markets. >> ger
situation. one part of europe is doing very well. germany, france, northern europe, generally speaking. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german workin
. it's the largest rink in france covering 1800 square meters. skaters can take to the ice every day until january 6th. so winter season kicking in. let's pull back and show you that france will still be seeing some wet and windy conditions. this is actually southwesterly winds that are dominating this area strengthening and making it a very wet scene, locally isolated rain will target portugal. temperature-wise not too bad. paris, 12 degrees for friday and saturday. on the rise he here in madrid at 14 degrees on your saturday, too. but the east is looking very chilly. kiev minus 5, moscow minus 9. that's for your high on friday. here's your extended forecast. >>> that concludes this edition of "newsline"." thanks for joining us.
and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3% or greater. >> if we do it now, w
the france where the thinker quarter gdp is showing growth of less than 1 is% for the whole 2012. stephane pedrazzi joins us now from paris. stepha stephane, not a great set of growth figures for france. >> no. that's because of the fourth quarter. now a contraction of 2% of gdp is being tracked. it believes the economy will improve marginally next year. its target, 1 mers increase for the first and second quarter of next year mainly because of flat consumer spending. you know consumer spending is the main growth driver in france, raising the prospect of the weaker expected growth next year again. the officials target for the government is at 0.8%. we might be below this target and if that's the situation, the government will need to find additional resources of budget cuts. this morning, the french president confirmed the deficit target of 3% for the next year. he also said that the unemployment rate should decline at the end of the year even if the next year will be a difficult one. in the meantime, french unions, and employers have decided to extend negotiations from competitive net in
taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3
quarter. the eu, banking -- things like nap but, again, still down. >> not great news for france if we start to look at some of the indexes. there's a lot of focus on this economy. >> exactly. and the weakest spots, given that it's the second largest economy. now, we did see that return to growth for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening glo
firmer agt the dollar. this is bank of france governor says the city of london should no longer be the main trading hub. is he whis links in tling in th is it doable? >> i think if you look at the figures they speak for themselves. at the moment 40% is actually this london compared to maybe 3% in france, 2% in germany, and it's not just that london dominates, but that the long term trend is actually away from france and germany and towards london. so a tough challenge for the ecb. >> so even if eurozone banks -- i suppose can they lean on eurozone banks to move their trading floors to paris and frankfurt. i don't know. >> that's true. and the fact is with currency, it's not just about trading the euro, it's what you trade on the other side, as well. london is the center for fx liquidity. that's the way it is. so the direction of things is not favoring anybody moving their trading floors towards mainland europe. >> fair enough. so what happens to the euro? we're sort of near a range high here at the moment. and how much problems are there going to the at 1.3050? >> it's an intere
in swiss francs. but because we are, again, operating in so many countries, having local costs, local currency costs as well as local currency revenues, we don't have any dilution of our profitability because of the strength of the swiss franc. so, actually, the more the swiss franc appreciates, you know, it has absolutely no effect on our profitability. it has an effect on the translation standpoint that it's stronger on the basis. >> okay. some interesting points. i think what's interesting is when you come here, we got a meeting today, kelly, of the account and they're going to approve pakistan later. but working on the bits of the doha rounds. one of the things that's going to be interesting is particularly the supply chaines and global exports. that's one of the things they think they can get pretty good progress on. for example, good at a port. why does the kaber have to be held up for sort of a week or two weeks and not put straight into the country? a lot of international countries saying that's a bigger hit on earnings than 1% or 2% in duty. it's getting this in the increasin
concerned about france and spain than i am about italy. >> we'll talk about those. >> let me add asking. if italy is in this situation now, it relied on the easy way out. and politicians, including berlusconi, didn't have the foresight to see that. >> thank you so much for coming by. >>> staying at the eurozone, investors will be watching for anything coming from the italian crisis. the results of the spanish bond actions are due around 12:40 cst. hsbc was hit with a $1.9 billion fine. the ceo said we accept responsibility for our mistakes and are profoundly sorry for them. >> a full year loft loss of 4.7 billion euros, thinksen krup has more details. >> they are starting to look at the positive of what i would call a -- strategy, i.e., a clean sweep when it comes to the business strategy of thyssenkrupp as well as the instruct occur and the refocusing on being transparent and definitely being something shareholders should trust. so no dividends, jobs may go and the sale of celiamerica being looked at. the cfo says there's a handful of interested parties in that particular party of the
to an absolute tax revolution in a country like france, doesn't it? >> well, i think it's a big departure from french people, and overall population for sure. and a real tax revolt would be for them to kick, you know, the people who govern them and have been for all of these years out of power and actually truly market oriented. stuart: are you french? >> yes. you're speaking in terms of free markets in france. >> yeah, imagine that. stuart: wait a second, prime minister hollande, the prime minister for six months or something like that, the guy who instituted the 70% tax. >> he campaigned on it. stuart: and people voted him in. >> the irony, the 75% tax rate is called a patriot, you know-- which made me laugh because the french are everything, but patriotic. stuart: and you've got people like depardu leaving and people are saying he's a hero for leaving, and not paying the patriotic tax, that's a repudiation of the tax and repudiation of the socialists? >> it could be. remember, like he's not the first one to leave. so first left-- before that. >> and he went back after years and moved his--
. about the third or week of august he gets a letter from france saying napoleon was having second thoughts. so severeson says, well, i do think we have the power there, and, boom, it's done. [laughter] franklin roosevelt, when he was taking the critical steps to preparing us and providing aid to britain in the runup to the great contest over liberty in the middle of the 20th century explicitly pointed to the louisiana purchase as a model for what an executive should do in a teem of crisis. in a time of crisis. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we
-- and increased focus on the origin of the food served. the recipe for this buckwheat pancakes is from france. the organic eggs sourced locally. regionalization and globalization at the same time. the finished mulled wine index is steadily climbing. more sophisticated, source will feel right at home here. the one-euro entry price will not be much of a financial setback to anyone dining here. a one-star chef serves gourmet specialties, and the dancers are a far cry from a traditional manger scene. not to mention the products. this necklace costs 480 euros. or how about an ivory tusk from an extinct mammoth? the specialty products for sale make the markets popular with international customers. >> a lot of things are handmade and not chinese. >> we have one in manchester. i wanted to see what the difference was. much better. >> christmas markets are a big draw for tourists and locals alike. this year's offerings are sure to delight a variety of pallets and budgets. and if there was any doubt, winter has most definitely arrived in germany. >> oh, yes, it has appeared the first bill falls in the c
:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting
confidence and trust in the eurozone. >> countries like france and italy have pat -- have pushed for a speedy resolution. banking supervision paves the way for a direct supervision -- direct injection into ailing banks. >> it is no longer the sole responsibility of the member states. rather, all of europe will step in. >> but president hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking system, be overseen by national authorities, and it got its way. >> it is important to have a clear division between banking supervision and monetary policy. >> the supervisor will begin work in march, 2014, and be responsible for banks holding more than 30 billion euros in assets. the deal should ensure european taxpayers no longer have to foot the bill when financial institutions find themselves in trouble. >> i'm very satisfied. contrary to expectations, the 27 finance ministers have managed to save the european council. >> as for the question of who will succeed john graja and kurt as head of the eurozone, that is something member
across germany. for more now, we had to the franc fort -- frankfurt stock exchange. positive news on the german economy. has that brought some cheer on the floor there? >> this is indeed a very nice christmas present and a strong signal that the german economy will recover again after its winter sleep, but the dax did not make a huge step forward. the stronger than expected ifo index may prevent european central banks from lowering interest rates again. >> we have had developments also in a libor scandal that broke earlier this summer. tell us about that. >> yes, the news is very bad. ubs has to pay the record fine of 1.2 billion euros in this libor scandal and its manipulation of interest rates. some british banks also have to pay millions of euros, and also deutsche bank is involved, and it is also in focus because exactly one week ago, hundreds of policemen into a bank in search of proof of tax fraud. hsbc has to pay $2 billion in a money-laundering case. the financial industry is working very hard for its bad reputation. the german dax is up 0.3%. euro stoxx 50 up .3%, and the
. in france, one village has been sealed off by police and surrounded by journalists after rumors spread that the local mountain would prove a safe haven. the locals fear an onslaught of new wave survivalists. >> we don't think the world this point and. >> you came here just for the fun of the story? >> famous journalists come to meet some crazy people. it might take more than a ufo to survive this if it turns out that the mine's ore right after all. mayans were right after all. >> -- was a painstakingly written by leonard cohen for his recording company. since then, it has been recorded it many times. what did he do to make the song so popular? this has risen from obscurity to one of the most famous tracks and modern music. >> the song starts completely off the radar. there are now 360 something recordings of songs around the world and the song was turned down by at leonard:'s record company has become perhaps one of the most popular songs of his generation. i'm the author of the holy or the broken, leonard cohen, jeff buckley, and the unlikely ascent of "hallelujah." it is always hard
, they were the uk and france in joint plays. >> i was hoping maybe the uk would get an olympics boost, but it appears to be still trailing italy by quite a ways. but there were no italian locations in the most instagram places until the world. six california locations made the list. and the top two places most snapped and shared on instagram may surprise you. they were the shopping mall in bangkok, thailand t b, and the sunni's airport. >> where is your top place that you would like to go, christian? >> i think i go with the americans here. i think it looks most likely that we're going to be in italy. >> i thought you meant he were going to the americas. but that's all right. >> i'm going with the americans will be. >> where in italy? >> sicily. sicily looks -- first of all, it's some place i've never been. in london any time of the year but certainly in summer. >> are you an instagram user? >> i am not. >> where do you want to go, kelly? >> in 2013? >> yes. >> i suppose i get around to see more of europe. i would love to go to russia and see moscow and st. petersburg. >> don't go in
>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss regulators $59 million in profits because the regulator can't fine ubs. the fine from the fsa is the biggest ever, 160 million pounds, $1.2 billion will go to the u.s. regulators. so the second biggest fine that was ever handed to a financial institution. of course, following that $1.9 billion fine that was given to hsbc. what we do know is that the company is admitting criminal wrongdoing in its japanese arm because, you know, around 30 traders worldwide had manipulated the yen libor between 2005 and 2010. the ceo speaking this morning says, you know, despite the troubles in the japanese arm, he does not believe that there's -- the bank is going to be shutting down the operations in that country entirely. saying that 30 to 40 people have already left the bank. they also gave us a bit more information on what kind of impact this will have on profits. they see a fourth quarter net loss of around 2.5 billion swig franks. a full-year profit of 2.5 to 3 billion. and the most important part, why shares are trading up. they
roughly speaking in the likes of italy and france and actually grew for germany. then in q4, it seems that there is a greater degree of destocking i think, materializing. i think that is going to lead to some weakness on the industrial production side and it does appear that the austerity is very much perceived by household and by service sector companies. and that explains this relatively soft data. it's a sign that really we are still in a period of multi-year major fiscal entrenchment and at the same time, we have a very cautious perspective towards taking on debt. both by the suppliers and the demanders of that debt. >> julian, very briefly, will we see more qe? will we see any more next year or not? >> well, it will depend, i think, on how things develop. on our baseline forecast, the answer to that would be no because we are looking for recovery coming through really reasonably significantly from the first quarter of next year with .4% quarter on quarter. >> julian, thanks for that. always good to see you. julian kelly joining us from barclays. which country is more corrupt and
with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to ge
't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put people out of work and that would have a negative effect on the economy, would it not? >> it would, adam. real quick, a bit of news here. president obama will deliver a statement at 4:45, something i imagine we'll cover live here on fox business. adam: we will. >> 5:45 president obama deliver as statement here at the white house. as far as spending cuts are concerned, you see this argument, you typically hear republicans say,
to raise the debt ceiling. dennis: what is a few hundred billion between france? coming up on our all-star panel, stop dithering in washington and get a deal done? cheryl: there's more hope for housing recovery. the national cessation of home builders now with the latest survey showing home builder confidence at its highest level since april of 2006. joining me is the ceo of the n h b and a lot of analysts were looking for that 50 mark and the index breaking through and what happened? >> just like everybody else, our members are watching the fiscal cliff discussions and potential implications of raising taxes on small businesses, small-businesses the 70% of the everybody else we are holding our breath and hovering just below 50%. cheryl: what do you remember about the mortgage interest deduction? that is on the table in the fiscal cliff, and you worry about housing? >> absolutely. with this recovery in release stages we are concerned about anything that would kill the markets and raising taxes on small business, and when the signs are positive, just a little more cautious than we thou
. appreciate it. france is pretty good, too. >> bye. >>> coming up, the early read on the trading session from the futures pits in chicago. >>> first, are you expecting a year-end bonus? what is that? you ever heard of -- no. we have not. a survey by challenger, gray, and christmas finds three out of four -- three out of four? will be handing them out. three out of four. thanks, nick. >> we're the bottom four. >> we're the four. handing them out, up 53%. we get these buttons. that's up 53% from a year ago. [ male announcer ] when gloria and her financial advisor made a retirement plan, they considered all her assets, even those held elsewhere, giving her the confidence to pursue all her goals. when you want a financial advisor who sees the whole picture, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 ml350 for $599 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>> dow futures up. s&p
the swiss franc. let's show where you we stand with oil prices right now. we've got nymex trading at 89. present at 110. both of them fairly steady. what about the outlook? joining us is peter hunt at rbc. peter, good morning to you. so does oil stay in this sort of recent ranges for the foreseeable future? >> actually we think it is. it sounds like sort of the risk of complacency. something we challenge ourselves on quite regularly. but given the points about china demand and global gdp, we're still very cautious in terms of demand, but the issue for the oil markets is supply and there are still big movements going on there. i think over the last three months, you've seen a really sharp fall in the output from iran. that's down below 3 million barrels a day for the first type since at least 2000. a lot of those volumes have been physically made by increases in iraq. but while they can make up the volume, they don't make up for the sense of instability. and i think as long as you have iran producing around a million down from a high of 4 billion only in 2008 and still needs to generate
rates is untenable. i mean, we're not talking about raising taxes like france to 75%, to the top rate. we're talking about 39.6, and let's be honest, with other loopholes and other deductions, it's going to be a lot lower. at the end of the day, you cannot deal with the fiscal situation this country faces without raising taxes, raising revenues. it's that simple. >> because we're only bringing in 17% of the gdp and sending 23 or 24. >> 15 1/2. >> i've got a new number. you sure that's the recent one? >> that's the most recent one -- >> there's a big differential. >> we're not bringing enough for everybody. but the ironic thing, and what makes us different from greece in this regard, i think a lot of the functionality is alarmingly familiar. but if we go over the cliff, what we actually do is resolve too much of our debt situation all at once. i mean, unlike greece, whose fiscal profglasy has them where they are today. >> except that if we go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, i mean, the message that sends to business leaders, employers, let a
to try to get wallace off the ticket. it was run by two people, the national chair that france and laws machine that got true many elected in 1940 and ended pauli was a california millionaire that said i went into politics and realized it was cheap to elect a new congress than to buy at the old way and he is going to get indicted for treason. >> so, they decide they're going to try to resolve delete user count him to convince him that he can't get free elective wallace is on the tickets. we are not denying that. in 1941 when henry made his famous speech saying the 20th century is to be the american sentry and the united states is and to dominate the world economically and politically and militarily and culturally. he responded to that as vice president and me the speech. they had the people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and russian revolution he called for ending colonialism and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokes
be if this is the top. certainly you saw money moving to the safer area of the bond market, for example, france, so the prices rose in france and it pushed the yield below 10%. there you go, pushed the yield on the ten-year below 2%. that rally to the core, france and germany, as you might expect. as far as stocks are concerned, generally we're stuck below horizontal resistance on the dow jones stock. if we break above that, it could be significant. ? we fail it could be significant. earlier in in china on the comment we got from the new head of the communist party, you have the best gains in three months on the chinese market. that fed automatically into the miners in europe. there has been some selling into it, but still broadly they are still higher. i do want to mention a couple corporate stories. apple is clearly down, margin requirements are being raised on some of those -- for some people who are extending apple shares, but nokia has had a very good day today. it's launched two phones, one priced at $249 to bring it light slid lower price for most people. most importantly launched a phone in
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
it on the revenue side. otherwise we're going to be looking at tax rates that would make france's new socialist government blush. you can't get there from here. >> i'll tell you something, jeb, i'm a stock guy. just like you, you don't want to talk about taxes. let's forget about this whole tax side. i want three ways to cut spending by $500 billion right now. how about we take social security up to 68. how about we slash medicare benefits? and why don't we cut the -- the defense budget? why do we need people in europe? why do we need them in japan? what are we doing in decree california? i want some answers to this. >> well, go to the web and look for the republican budget. that was written by the chairman of our budget committee paul ryan. you will see these savings -- >> 30-year, 40-year plan. i want to know what we can do -- >> well -- number one, defense has already been cut. we can debate how much it should be cut further but it has already been cut. i mean that's just a fact. >> but we added -- >> -- defense on the republican side. you have that global war turf. -- good idea. >> say agai
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you ha
rates is unten nabl. i mean, we're not talking about raising tacks like france from 75% to the top rate. we're talking about 39.6 and let's be honest, with other loopholes and deductions, it's going to be a lot lower. at the end of the day, you cannot deal with the fiscal situation that this country faces without raising taxes and revenues. it's simple. >> we're only bringing in 17%çf the gdp and spending 23 or 24. >> 15 1/2. >> i've got a new number. are you sure that's the recent number? >> anyway, we're not bringing in enough revenue. et ironic thing which makes us different from greece in this regard is a lot the dysfunction nalt is alarmingly familiar. if we go over the cliff, we resolve too much of a debt situation all at once, unlike greece where they are today, interestingly, if you actually go over the cliff, you get on a budget path that's a far more sustainable than the current one, we do it much too quickly. >> except if you go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, the message it sends to business leaders, employers, this place is not
's a little town in france. >> and you were there? >> i was there when i was in the air force. i was stationed very close to there. now i was flying jet fighters, we had a nuclear mission. we didn't fly with nukes but we stood alert with them. and so it was a dicey time. "reminiscence at toul." 30 years ago on new year's eve drunk on french champagne we shot bottle rockets from the windows of hank and willi's rented chateau overlooking nancy. it sounds so worldly which is how we wanted to think of ourselves, but lord, we were just children, sent by the government to fly airplanes and to save western europe from world war iii. we thought we had all the important things still left to do and were just playing at importance for the time being. it never occurred to us, living in our community of friends, having first babies, seeing husbands die, helping young widows pack to go home, that we had already started the important things. what could we have been thinking, or perhaps it's how could we have known that times get no better, that important things come without background music, that life is lar
, compared to a place like france, where government spending is more than half of gdp. but it is going to keep creeping up and i think we need to be creative and alert to that. >> rose: i want to talk about what is going on in washington now between the president and the speaker, but if we -- if they fail completely and we go over this fiscal cliff what are the repercussions? you know, i mean, there is really a fair chance that they don't come to an agreement for whatever reason the house republicans won't support it and we go into 2013. i don't think that, per say, would be the end of the world because i think there would be a cry and it would get rein reined in after a few weeks and settle on this .. i would view this as a skirmish in a bigger war where you are growing entitlements, government services are getting more expensive. people are going to pay more and get less, and i think it is a very, very difficult tension of how to deal with that and this is just a first stage of that or one of many stages. so i don't think they are going to settle everything. i do hope they come to an
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